The ultimate form fills for landing pages

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By: Julie Bernhard

The lead generation game is more than just the thrill of the chase.  Absurd amounts of time and resources are dumped into creating content and planning campaigns – all for the hope of a possible new customer.  With that amount of action, marketers, too, have the same goal as the customer – getting the most bang for their buck.

Landing pages serve as invaluable tool when trying to reel in some fresh meat.  Aside from the website, these guys have just one goal in mind – grabbing those digits – or capturing the visitor’s data in this case.  Landing pages deliver, too – in fact, the conversion rate on the landing page is high – over a quarter of people who visit the site leave their details.  But, that is if you haven’t scared them off.

In order to attract that data, it is imperative to keep the visitor’s eye on the target.  Landing pages that are too flashy or ask too much can make the prospect peace out quickly.  So, what kind of skills does a company need to get these forms filled?

Less is more.

Simplicity is key to any good landing page.  Any additional items or links that don’t contribute to the ultimate goal are not necessary in this case.  The key is not to overwhelm your target.  A good start for any B2B landing page just needs a name, job title and email address.  It requires only a little bit of time for the recipient, and you are able to specify what they do and where they do it.  Anything after that can be tailored to the industry.  With too many options on your landing page, visitors may find an option other than filling out your form to be more enticing.  Don’t remind them of the other fish in the sea.

Be clear with your intentions.

It is said that the attention span of a visitor of your landing page is only a matter of seconds.  In order to not only get, but also keep that attention, you must be up front about what kind of information you are exactly seeking.  If the objective isn’t clear, they are going to keep surfing for what else is out there.  Nobody needs more options.

Make it clear, relevant, concise. Don’t put too much text on the page, or it could make the visitor go cross-eyed.  Bullet points can drive home the messaging as well.  Only ask for what you actually need – and make sure they know why you need it.  Nobody likes a tease.

Get some action, or at least call for it.

The whole point of the pursuit is to make a conversion.  But the only way to ensure that – is to make sure they are finalizing your form and clicking the call-to-action.  Your CTA is the action you want your website visitor to take. All the traffic to the landing page won’t matter unless they click the magic button.

After you have determined your most pertinent information you are seeking, you got to give them the final reason as to why they even filled it out.  You got to give them something in return.  It all boils down to two key factors, according to an article on the unbounce blog.  What is its value and what is its relevance?

Landing pages can be a quick fix when looking for some prospective customers, but that isn’t until you understand the method to the madness.  Data is great, but not if you can’t use it.  Just like most things in life, the best ones are always fast and easy.


julie bernhardJulie Bernhard brings a vast communication background to MultiBriefs where she serves as executive editor. A native of Boerne, Texas, and journalism graduate from Texas State University, Julie first served as editor-in-chief of her high school newspaper and from there her passion flourished. In college, she wrote for the student publication The University Star, worked as on-air reporter for the student radio station and news station, in addition to interning at several local TV stations. Her first job was with a nonprofit organization where she served as the communications specialist, creating and producing everything from their publications to commercials. You can also find her on Twitter.

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